The Lasting Concept began as a conversation between Rob Halverson and curators Bob Nickas and Kristan Kennedy. While record shopping and coming across the compilation album The Blasting Concept put out by SST, Nickas placed his finger over the letter “B” and uttered the phrase “Lasting Concept.” From there, Halverson and Nickas began riffing back and forth about making a magazine of the same name. The magazine was to sit somewhere conceptually and spatially between the great art journals May and October. Kennedy committed to publishing The Lasting Concept, if the magazine ever came to fruition. Submissions were solicited and text was written, however it never quite came together.

In a recent conversation between Kennedy and Halverson, they revisited the idea. Halverson had decided that the project was now best suited to take the form of an exhibition called The Lasting Concept. The exhibition is curated by Halverson with a poetic but absolutely precise statement edited by Nickas (below). The Lasting Concept is centered around four new site-specific works based on past serial sculptures and interventions by Gaylen Gerber, Gareth James, Christoph Meier, and Sam Pulitzer and Bill Hayden. The works in The Lasting Concept are things that stay in Curator’s memory. They are notations of other times and other places, other exhibitions, other books, and other projects which come together to form new connections and meaning.


Richard AldrichElizabeth BishopLouise BourgeoisJayne CortezRobert CreeleyJimmie DurhamMelvin EdwardsGaylen GerberRobert GrenierRob HalversonBill Hayden & Sam PulitzerGareth JamesYuki KimuraNevine MahmoudChristoph MeierJean-Luc MoulèneGeorge OppenNathaniel T PriceSara Greenberger RaffertyAnne SextonJack SpicerSue TompkinsDinah YoungStefan Tcherepnin

The Lasting Concept

Translation from one language into itself.
An inquiry as to the nature and purpose of images and words entwined.
Our reasons both slender and unreasonable, we proceed with the greatest urgency.

For the preservation of certain inalienable rights.
A life which is lifelike. Pursuit rather than attainment.
Free speech and the right to remain silent.

There are times when rage and matter simply … collide.

Our belief in free association, well trampled though it may be, perhaps the greatest path to reason.

We will amend you. This is the enforcement of law.

A human certainty …

Is every life interesting enough for a play?

A song heard in the distance, familiar even as the record turns hazily.

m a t e r i a l … o b j e c t s … p o s s e s s i v e … u n r e a l c i r c l e s … g a m e s …
c o n t r a d i c t i n g l i e s … w h y s e e y o u r s e l f …

as it comes to an end, the voice stutters in the dust …
y r e g o … y r e g o … y r e g o …

After all, the difference between a groove and a grave is only … a matter of depth.

A desiccated hand shudders to lift the arm and the needle.

All the untidy activity continues, awful but cheerful.

The lasting Concept will prevail.

- – Above excerpt from Bob Nickas


what a mess everything is,

a group show points at a “human certainty”.
the end that is the dot in the distance and all bumps on the way there.

what a mess everything is

- -

incomplete thoughts
name in fragments
the list grows longer and strangely less intelligible
alternative to the facts of lived experience
so abstract
would it not be

- above some words plucked from description of scorched earth journal project.

death at the end of that dot in the distance

never exhaustible filling than refilling
every month or so?
next up a dog shitting in the streets
a pointing system of stored moments
help help
they heard the new fruit drop
the waves keep at it
furniture is moved
it’s all overlapping
and look for it
all repeat or you could say
big smiling face this is everyone
what a world it is when the center is that